David Lloyd Clubs recently opened a pop-up restaurant called The Good Plates. Created to help encourage positive mental health through healthy eating, it served a delicious six-course sharing menu starring seasonal, mood-boosting foods and ingredients known to complement positive mental health.

While the event has now ended and tickets are no longer available, you can find the recipes for each of the fantastic dishes below, should you wish to try making them yourself:

Chargrilled Venison, Spent Coffee, Blueberries, Roast Salsify, Trompette Mushrooms, Mint

Halibut Tranche, Seaweed Butter, Winter Tomatoes, White Beans

Wild Mushroom & Kale Toban, Sprouting Broccoli, Sunflower Seed, Onsen Egg, Black Truffle

Roast Salmon, Herb Labneh, Poached Cucumber, Beach Herbs, Salmon Roe

Wood Roasted Monkfish, Chickpeas, Walnut Gremolata

Wood Grilled Cauliflower, Almond Miso, Black Beluga Lentils, Curry Butter

This delicious dish is low in fat, yet rich in many nutrients, notably B vitamins, required for maintaining serotonin levels in the brain. Aside from B1, B3, B6 and B12, venison is also a source of iron, which helps maintain energy levels. Iron absorption is encouraged by the berries which are rich in vitamin C. There are more B vitamins and iron in salsify, but it’s especially rich in B6, required for dopamine and serotonin production. Folate, found in mushrooms and salsify, can help maintain mood while magnesium can help alleviate fatigue and maintain brain function.  Lastly, the dish is a source of amino acids, required for the manufacture of neurotransmitters.

The Venison

Cooking time is for a medium-rare cuisson

500g venison rack/loin

2 tbsp olive oil

Salt & pepper

  1. Rub the venison with oil and seasoning
  2. Cook over charcoal for 8-12 mins (depending on the size) turning and flipping every minute
  3. Brush with the coffee glaze (below) in the last few minutes of grilling
  4. Rest and hold warm

Coffee Glaze

2 tbsp unsalted butter

2 tbsp malt extract

2 tbsp malt vinegar

2 tbsp water

1 tsp spent coffee grinds

  1. Warm all the ingredients in a small sauce pan, until smooth
  2. Keep warm

Roasted Salsify

300g salsify

1 lemon

2 tbsp unsalted butter

2 sprig thyme

2 tbsp meat jus

1 tbsp merlot vinegar

Salt & pepper

  1. Fill a saucepan 2/3 with water then add the lemon, squeezing all the juice in first
  2. Peel the salsify quickly, rinsing under cold water
  3. Then cut into 3 inch sticks and add to the pan with the lemon water
  4. Bring to boil, then simmer for 15mins or until just cooked
  5. Drain and cool
  6. In a separate pan, over a med-high heat, add the butter and thyme
  7. Add the salsify and brown all over
  8. Deglaze with the vinegar and when that has evaporated, add the jus
  9. Reduce to a glaze, season and keep warm

Assembly

80g trompette mushrooms – picked, washed and lightly sauté

2 tbsp blueberries

100ml meat jus

6-8 mint leaves

  1. On a large plate, lay the sticks of salsify
  2. Carve the venison and arrange over the salsify
  3. Heat the jus and add the blueberries and trompettes just before saucing the plate
  4. Finish with torn mint leaves

This dish is naturally low in saturated fats, yet a good source of DHA, which is found in halibut and oily fish and required for the building and maintaining of the brain. Halibut is also a source of vitamin B12 along with B3 and B6, all of which help maintain mood. Seaweed is especially rich in iodine, a nutrient that helps promote thyroid function and thus can help to some degree with anxiety and depression. Zinc, found in Cannellini beans, can help to enhance mood and memory. The dish is also a source of magnesium, low levels of which can be a factor in the onset of depression.

The Halibut

500g Halibut on the bone

Warm unsalted butter or olive oil

Salt and pepper

  1. Sous vide or steam at 51c for 25-30 mins
  2. Pat dry and rub with oil or butter
  3. Season with salt & pepper
  4. Finish on a hot charcoal grill, basting with extra oil or butter
  5. Rest and keep warm

Seaweed Butter

1 block unsalted Butter

100g Dulse Seaweed – finely chopped

½ Lemon Zest & Juice

Salt & Pepper

  1. Soften the butter to work the other ingredients in
  2. Store in the fridge, but you will need it softened for this recipe

White Beans

500g Coco or Cannellini Beans – soaked overnight

1 carrot

1 celery

1 onion

4 bay leaves

50ml XV Olive Oil

  1. Put all contents in a saucepan and fill with fresh water
  2. Bring to the boil and then reduce to a simmer
  3. Cook for 30-40 minute, until soft. *Make sure they’re always just covered with water
  4. Cool them down and store in their liquid
  5. Season when cool

Winter Tomatoes

5 iberiko tomatoes – cut in half, horizontally

3 garlic cloves

1 sprig rosemary

4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tbsp merlot vinegar

1 tbsp water

Salt & pepper

  1. In a skillet or heavy bottom fry pan, heat the oil on a med-high heat
  2. Add the tomatoes, cut side down and cook for 3-4 minutes
  3. Turn the heat down to very low, then add the rest of ingredients
  4. Cover with a lid, and allow tomatoes to continue cooking for 20-30 mins, until soft
  5. Turn the tomatoes over and add a handful of the white beans
  6. Keep hot

Assembly

½ bunch flat leaf parsley – chopped

½-1 lemon juice

  1. Serve the tomatoes and beans on a large platter
  2. Dress with some of the softened seaweed butter, so it melts into the tomatoes
  3. Place the halibut on top then garnish with chopped parsley and lemon juice to taste

Wild Mushroom & Kale Toban, Sprouting Broccoli, Sunflower Seed, Onsen Egg, Black Truffle

This dish is nutrient-dense and offers high concentrations of some of the key nutrients that the human body uses to make serotonin and dopamine. Sunflower seeds are especially rich in folate, (which is also found in kale and broccoli). Indeed, one portion supplies over 100% of the day’s suggested intake. Seeds are also very rich in B1, B3 and B6, needed for neurotransmitters. The dish is also rich in magnesium. which can help to alleviate anxiety. Lastly, one portion of this dish delivers nearly all the day’s suggested zinc intake, a nutrient which is used in the hippocampus, an area of the brain that regulates emotion and memory.

Wild Mushrooms

500g wild mushroom mix

50ml olive oil

  1. Pick and wash the mushrooms
  2. Sauté lightly in oil
  3. Season and reserve

Sprouting Broccoli

2 bunch purple sprouting broccoli

  1. Remove hard stalk, but keep florets and good leaves
  2. Blanch or steam for 4-5 mins, refresh in ice water
  3. Season and reserve

Purple Kale

1 handful Purple Kale

  1. Pick and wash the kale
  2. Blanch or steam for 3 mins, refresh in ice water
  3. Season and reserve

Sunflower Seed Puree

500g sunflower seeds

100ml olive oil

button mushrooms

Salt & pepper

  1. Put all the ingredients in a sauce pan and enough water to cover
  2. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 1 hour or until very soft – make sure they’re always just covered with water
  3. Allow to cool a little and then blitz everything to a smooth puree – take care while blitzing hot ingredients!
  4. Season
  5. Reheat to order and keep hot

Sauce

20ml light soy

20ml dark soy

60ml Shaoxing wine

100ml mushroom stock

1 star anise

1 tsp fresh ginger – minced

1-2 tsp potato flour mixed with a little cold water

  1. Heat all the ingredients (except potato flour mix) and simmer for 5 mins
  2. Take out the star anise and add the potato flour
  3. Bring to the boil and reserve

Assembly

2 burford brown eggs – poached

2 tbsp pumpkin seed oil

1 tbsp toasted pumpkin seeds

black truffle

  1. In a clay pot, put a generous spoon of the sunflower seed puree
  2. Build the mushrooms, kale and broccoli around
  3. Pour over the sauce, then bake for 6-8 mins, until everything is bubbling hot
  4. Top with the poached eggs, pumpkin seeds and oil
  5. Serve immediately and grate the truffle at the table!

One of the most important dietary elements for maintaining mood is fat -especially omega 3 fats, found in oily fish. One portion of this light and tasty dish supplies over 2000mg of DHA, the most useful form of omega 3 fats. In addition, salmon is rich in vitamin B12 and a source of B1, B3 and B6, all of which help in the efficient manufacture of mood enhancing neurotransmitters. Yogurt contains iodine, which supports optimum thyroid function, whilst cucumber contains yet more B6 as well as folate and magnesium, which can alleviate symptoms of depression.

Salmon

500g salmon fillet – organic or wild

Olive oil

Salt & pepper

2 tbsp unsalted butter

  1. Heat the oven to 200c
  2. Score thin lines through the skin of fillet from top to bottom
  3. Rub the fish with oil and seasoning
  4. Heat a fry pan over med-high heat with a little more oil
  5. Cook the salmon skin side down until the sides of the fish start to change colour to a light pink
  6. Transfer to the oven for 4-5 mins depending on the thickness of the fillet
  7. Remove from oven and then flip the salmon over
  8. Add the butter and let it foam, as you baste the fish for 1 minute
  9. Remove from heat and rest warm

Herb Labneh

400g Greek yoghurt

2 tbsp chopped soft herbs – parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil, dill

2 tbsp olive oil

Salt & pepper

  1. Lay the Greek yoghurt on some muslin or a food safe j-cloth and tie into a ball
  2. Let it hang overnight, so the excess whey
  3. The next day it should look like a cream cheese. This is labneh!
  4. Mix the labneh with the soft herbs, olive oil and season

Poached Cucumber

1 cucumber – peeled

  1. Cut the cucumber in half lengthways, then using a spoon, scrape the core out so you have a canoe
  2. Lay the cucumber down on the cut side, and cut finger size pieces on the bias
  3. Put the cucumber in boiling water for 10 seconds and then into ice water
  4. Drain and reserve

Beach Herbs

150g beach herbs – samphire, sea purslane, salty fingers, sea beets

Extra virgin olive oil

Black pepper

  1. Pick and wash the beach herbs
  2. Blanch in boiling water for 30-40 seconds
  3. Drain and seasoning with olive oil and black pepper

Assembly

Salmon roe

Green herb oil

Lemon juice

  1. Smear the labneh around a large platter, then dress with some herb oil
  2. Place the salmon on top
  3. Mix the cucumber with the beach herbs and dress the top of the fish
  4. Squeeze a little lemon juice over the dish
  5. Finish with dots of salmon roe over and around

This nutrient-dense dish is rich in protein and fibre, which help to regulate blood glucose levels to prevent dips in energy. The brain consists of 60% fat, and the structure and substance of brain cell membranes is supported by fats found in the diet, such as in walnuts and oily fish. Walnuts contain more protein, consisting of amino acids that help create neurotransmitters required for the relay of thoughts and feeling in the brain. Chickpeas provide many nutrients, including B2 and B6, both of which are involved in the manufacture of serotonin. They are especially rich in folate, low levels of which have been linked to low mood. Lastly, monkfish supplies B12 which helps the brain manufacture serotonin and dopamine.

The Monkfish

600g Monkfish on the bone, skinless

Warm unsalted butter or olive oil

Salt and pepper

  1. Sous vide or steam at 51c for 25-30 mins
  2. Pat dry and rub with oil or butter
  3. Season with salt & pepper
  4. Finish on a hot charcoal grill, basting with extra oil or butter
  5. Rest and keep warm

We recommend cooking your own chickpeas so here’s a recipe for them. Otherwise use very good quality tinned or jarred.

Chickpeas

300g dried chickpeas – soaked overnight, drained

1 onion

1 carrot

1 celery stick

1 leek

6 clove garlic

1 red chili

bouquet garnis of rosemary, thyme, bay

100ml extra virgin olive oil

  1. Put all contents in a saucepan and fill with fresh water
  2. Bring to the boil for 10 mins and then reduce to a simmer
  3. Cook for 1.5/2 hours, until soft – make sure they’re always just covered with water
  4. Cool them down and store in their liquid
  5. Season when cool

Whole Roast Chickpea

200g of drained chickpeas

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 sprig rosemary

2 clove garlic

Salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste

  1. Warm the olive oil in a sauté pan, with rosemary and garlic over a medium heat
  2. Add the chickpeas and increase the heat
  3. Cook for a minute or two, until they have a firmer texture
  4. Season with salt, pepper and lemon
  5. Keep warm

Chickpea Puree

300g of chickpeas and just enough of the cooking liquid to cover

50ml extra virgin olive oil

½ -1 lemon juice

Salt & pepper to taste

  1. Put all ingredients except the salt & pepper in a blender
  2. Blitz at high speed until you have a very smooth puree
  3. Add more of the cooking liquid if it’s not blending well
  4. Season and keep warm

Pickled Baby Onions

200g pomegranate molasses

50ml merlot vinegar

200g baby onions – borretane or cipollini are my favourites

  1. Roast the onions over a fire or coals, until the skins blacken. They should steam in their own moisture
  2. Once cool, remove the charred skin
  3. Warm the molasses and vinegar
  4. Pour over the onions and keep warm

Walnut Gremolata

50g walnuts – roasted

25g parsley

1 lemon zest

1 garlic clove

50ml walnut or extra virgin olive oil

Salt to taste

  1. Roughly chop the walnuts and parsley and put in a small mixing bowl
  2. Grate lemon zest
  3. Finely grate in the garlic
  4. Add the oil and season

Assembly

  1. On a large plate, put the chickpea puree right in the centre
  2. The monkfish can then sit proudly on top
  3. Put the roasted chickpeas over the monkfish, allowing any to naturally fall off
  4. Dot the pickled onions, over and around
  5. Finally, top with the gremolata
  6. Serve immediately

This plant-based dish combines fibre with protein, which helps keep glucose levels in check and produces consistent energy levels. Yoghurt offers iodine which supports neurotransmitters, responsible for relaying thoughts and feelings. Lentils are a good source of B vitamins, further required for serotonin and dopamine, along with iron and magnesium, both of which promote energy levels. But its folate that’s most abundant in this dish, found in high levels in black lentils and in cauliflower too. Folate supports normal amino acid synthesis, used to make those all-important neurotransmitters.

Cauliflower

  1. Steam the cauliflower for 30 mins at 100c
  2. Brush with some of the melted curry butter and grill over wood and charcoal until nicely coloured
  3. Keep warm

Curry Butter

1 block unsalted butter

1 tbsp curry powder – the best quality you can find

½ Lemon Zest & Juice

Salt & Pepper

  1. Soften the butter to work the other ingredients in
  2. Store in the fridge, but you will need to melt it for this recipe

Miso Yoghurt

200g Greek yoghurt

1 tbsp white miso paste

1 tbsp. ground almonds – lightly toasted

½ lemon juice

50-100ml water – to give you a cream like consistency

  1. Mix all together and keep at room temp

Beluga Lentils

250g beluga lentils

1 small fennel

2 banana shallots

1 celery

6 clove garlic

2 bay leaves

100ml extra virgin olive oil

Salt & pepper

Chopped soft herbs – parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil, dill

  1. Dice the vegetables finely, then sweat slowly in a large sauce pan with the olive oil and the bay leaves
  2. When the vegetables are soft, add the lentils and enough water to just cover
  3. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 15-20 mins, or until just cooked
  4. Remove from heat and season
  5. Keep them store in their cooking liquor until needed
  6. Warm the back up in just a little of the cooking liquor, throw in the soft herbs and a little more olive oil if needed
  7. Keep warm

Assembly

1 bunch curry leaves – picked from stalk and deep fried until crispy

80g curry butter – melted

2 tbsp roasted almonds – chopped

1 tsp pul biber (Turkish pepper flakes)

2 tbsp fried shallots – homemade or store bought

  1. In a large bowl plate, put a generous amount of the lentils, with some of their juice
  2. Cut the cauliflower into large wedges and arrange on top of the lentils
  3. Dress with the miso yoghurt
  4. Finish with the melted butter, chopped almonds, pul biber, crispy shallot and finally the curry leaves

At David Lloyd Clubs, we serve a number of nutritious and delicious dishes packed with seasonal food. Find out more about food and drink at David Lloyd Clubs.

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All The Delicious Recipes From The Good Plates Menu
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All The Delicious Recipes From The Good Plates Menu
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David Lloyd Clubs
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